Australian Medical Robotics Academy will train surgeons from all over the world

robotic surgery academy, the venture magazine

Of all the prestigious medical schools in the world, you’d be hard-pressed to find one that specialises in robotic surgery. That will change when the Australian Medical Robotics Academy opens in 2019 in Melbourne’s Parkville medical precinct. The Victorian government has allotted $2 million for the training centre, which will teach surgeons how to perform robotic surgery in hard-to-reach areas of the body.

While there a few hospitals in Victoria already performing robotic surgery, the academy will help make the practice more widespread. Robotic surgery is primarily useful in prostate cancer procedures, but it has gynecological applications as well and can come in very handy for ear, nose, and throat surgeries. The academy will also have virtual reality surgical simulators, allowing surgeons from all over the world to practice their skills before operating on human patients.

robotic surgery academy, the venture magazine

“This cutting-edge facility will usher in a new age of surgery that will change the lives of patients from right around the world,” Victoria Minister for Health Jill Hennessy said. “We’re putting Victoria at the forefront of the highest standards of surgical training. The world’s brightest medical minds will travel here from all over the world to learn new skills.”

Because they are minimally invasive, robotic surgery procedures often lead to higher survival rates and lower rates of complication, making for shorter hospital stays. The Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and Menzies Health Institute published a study in July showing robotic prostate surgery to be safe and effective in an overview of 300 surgeries in a two-year period.

Research and Markets predicts the global robotic surgery field will be valued at $17.4 billion by 2025.

“We’re putting Victoria at the forefront of the highest standards of surgical training. The world’s brightest medical minds will travel here from all over the world to learn new skills,” Hennessy said. “Our cancer survival rates are among the best in the world, but we’ll never rest on our laurels. Every day, we’re working to find cures, aid treatment and benefit the lives of patients.”